Sunday, June 3, 2012

De nada, empanada: Spanish Rhyming Phrases

Making rhymes and playing with words is one of the most reliable indicators that children are getting control of language.  They are becoming aware of words and sounds and can manipulate these to express themselves -- and impress others!  --Patricia Cunningham, Phonics They Use (1995)

I live with a two-year-old and a four-year-old and phrases like "Silly Billy" and "Okie dokie, Artichokie!" are spoken almost hourly.  Why?  Because they're so much fun to say!  AND because, like magic, my girls pay more attention to me when I rhyme!



I consulted my Facebook friends for some examples of short Spanish rhyming phrases and I loved their responses.  I think these would be perfect for any bilingual teacher to incorporate into her daily dialogues.  Remember, they're like MAGIC!  Kids listen to them AND they repeat them.

Of course, they might confuse them at times too.  My two-year-old told her nursery teacher at church today, "See you later, crocodile!"  :)  Baby steps...baby steps!

13 comments:

  1. Lol. Love this!
    I'm sure my kiddos would love it too! Thanks for posting. =)

    -Karla
    TheSpanshlishClassroom.blogspot.com

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  2. This is great! I have an ongoing list as well, would you mind if I include some of yours? It's easy peasy in English, but I really have to think for cute Spanish phrases :)
    ☼Libby
    Dual Kinder Teacher

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    Replies
    1. Of course! I heard some more today that I hope to add soon!

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  3. My son says, "Mira para arriba, se te cae la barriga." He says 2 others that rhyme with "foco" and "abajo" instead of "arriba."
    How can we forget "colorín colorado, este cuento se ha acabado." Also, at home we say rico-pico, mango-chango, feliz como una lombriz,

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  4. Actually, we have quite a large selection of these that we call Drimas! We used these all last year with our PreK students! They loved them and were creating their own Drimas (Rimas Divertidas)! Look for them soon on our website! dk

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  5. I haven't been able to figure out what de volón means.

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  6. Isn't it an even more colloquial way to say "de volada" which means so quickly; like flying. That's what it sounds like to me. :-)

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  7. You are right it does mean to do it quickly :)

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  8. I just read this to my husband and he added "¿Qué es eso, libra de queso?", "¿Adónde vas, Barrabas?" and "¿Qué ha pasado, pescado?" He's Costa Rican. I think I'm going to have my district print out a large poster of these and hang 'em where all the kids can see them. I put up a positive/negative rejoinders poster for exclamations in the TL during story-asking and they used it constantly! What a kick!

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